The Catalyst … accelerating business growth in healthcare

Essential Healthcare Management Announces Alliance with CapStack West

Posted by Frank Ripullo on Wed, Jun 21, 2017 @01:58 AM

Partnership Enhances Opportunities for Medical Manufacturing Companies Requiring Capital

Laguna Hills, CA -- (ReleaseWire) -- 06/14/2017 -- Essential Healthcare Management, Inc. (EHM), a healthcare business consulting firm, announced a strategic partnership with CapStack West, a private social business capital community matching capital providers and capital requestors regardless of capital type, with growing companies searching for investment sources.

"We now have a partner aggregating the right investors to offer funding opportunities to companies of all sizes," said Frank Ripullo, Founder and President of EHM. "Whether our clients seeking cash infusion are pre-revenue startups looking for equity investors, middle-market companies requiring growth or acquisition capital, or, market leaders after expansion capital, the CapStack West community streamlines the process. Our network now has access to a trusted, cost-effective online platform where posting a request for capital instantly gains exposure to over 20,000 potential investors, confidentially and discreetly."

"We are excited to partner with Essential Healthcare Management, a key strategic medical consultancy bringing new and exciting innovations to the industry," said Ken Hubbard, CEO CapStack West. "The medical device industry is competitive and growing at an accelerated pace. Companies of all sizes are looking for capital or the next acquisition to add to their portfolio. CapStack West and its partners are committed to accelerating the goal of bringing all forms of capital to medical companies in any stage of growth."

CapStack West's private social community automates the process of capital deployment. Included in the community are Experts and Services (ex. Valuation calculators and AI competitive analysis engines). Both providers and requestors start by populating a brief profile. Automatic matching algorithms notify providers through the platforms simple DEALS page, which segregates deals into easily managed windows. Deal communications, content and documents are organized per deal for efficient review and response. Teams can collaborate privately and with executive teams managing requestors, sharing information and calendaring meetings accelerates capital deployment.

All requestors remain private, only seen by the matched capital provider. Providers stay private as well, walled off from requestors, unless there is a match. Both have direct access to posting content to bolster their offerings. CapStack West does not charge success fees and members can put their membership on hold once funds are secured. They can reopen their profile, change the type of capital and amount, and raise funds throughout their corporate lifecycle.

For more information about Essential Healthcare Management, Inc. and CapStack West, visit the websites: http://www.essentialhm.net/and https://http://www.capstackwest.com.

About Essential Healthcare Management, Inc.

Essential Healthcare Management, Inc. is a leading healthcare consultancy partnering with medical industry suppliers to promote growth by aligning corporate accounts strategies for its clients. EHM serves a variety of suppliers enjoying market access and contract uptake through group purchasing organizations (GPO), integrated delivery networks (IDN), and, regional purchasing coalitions (RPC). To facilitate rapid growth, EHM retains an unparalleled network of senior executives. Services include national accounts management, growth planning, contract negotiations, sales, and, marketplace assessment. For more information, call 949-842-2520.

About CapStack West

CapStack West is a private social community built specifically to accelerate the deployment of capital. CapStack West delivers a true social community experience for companies looking for equity or debt as well as capital providers deploying all types of funds. CapStack West is a subscription platform not charging percentage-based, success fees. The platform includes deal management, group and private video/audio/text chat, calendaring, content posting services and target advertising.

Tags: business development

Michael Bomstad Joins EHM Team

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Mon, Nov 12, 2012 @12:56 PM

MICHAEL BOMSTAD JOINS ESSENTIAL HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT

NOVEMBER 12, 2012 - Essential Healthcare Management (EHM) has announced that healthcare industry veteran Michael Bomstad has joined the EHM Team. Mike is a highly recognized innovator and leader with 20 years of healthcare industry experience.  His areas of expertise include GPO and IDN relationship development, complex contract negotiations, business and sales planning and implementation, innovative partnering and business start-ups.  As an industry consultant, Mike initiated and completed a first-of-its-kind partnership between a pharmaceutical company and a large hospital group, saving the hospital group $30 million while helping grow revenues for the pharmaceutical partner.  He has also developed an innovative and highly successful business model to introduce generic drugs to the US market.

Mike served as Senior Vice President for the $2B group purchasing program at Child Health Corporation of America (CHCA) where his team increased hospital savings in three years by more than 500%.  His team grew revenue by 20% annually for a ten-year period, and he personally negotiated more than $1B of group purchasing agreements during his tenure.  His demonstrated expertise includes working with senior level and operational management in the medical device, pharmaceutical, distribution and hospital industries, and he has been a member of the Association of Healthcare Materials and Resource Management (AHRMM), the Health Industry Group Purchasing Association (HIGPA), the Healthcare Industry Group Purchasing Industry Initiative (HGPII) and served on the Strategic Advisory Committee of CHCA’s GPO partner, Premier Purchasing Partners, Inc.

Prior to CHCA, Mike was a professional associate at the Center for Business Innovation, a business incubator, where he was responsible for business plan development, strategic partnering, and equity and debt financing assistance for start-up and early-stage technology companies.  Mike also served as a Member of the Kansas City Board of Trade where he traded commodities and stock-index futures for institutional clients.

Mike holds an MBA from the University of Kansas where he was a Graduate Business Scholar, and a BS in Agricultural Economics from the University of Missouri

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, hospitals, healthcare suppliers, gpos, IDNs, leader, GPO, business growth, business development

EHM and Intego

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Thu, Oct 04, 2012 @01:42 PM

ESSENTIAL HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT LEADS INTEGO, A CRITICAL ALERT SYSTEMS COMPANY, IN EXPANDING NATIONAL ACCOUNTS STRATEGY

DALLAS – September 26th, 2012 – (EHM) a healthcare business consulting firm, was chosen by Intēgo® to help secure contracts with integrated delivery networks and group purchasing organizations across the United States.

EHM is a healthcare business development firm, creating demand for the products and services of leading medical suppliers.  Since 2007, the group has served the needs of clients, combining corporate accounts strategy and operational infrastructure.  EHM guides clients through the procurement process and helps companies present their offerings to key decision makers and target audiences.

Intēgo® has been the leading manufacturer and installer for healthcare communication products and services for the healthcare industry since 1985. Intēgo® provides Nurse Call products to hospitals and skilled nursing facilities nationwide.  The Intego Software’s CommonPath™system is the most comprehensive nurse call solution on the market. It is designed to accommodate today’s three principal nurse call modes of operation; Direct to Caregiver, traditional to nurse station, and the CommonPath Centralized™ approach.

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, EHM, medical, healthcare suppliers, medical devices, brand management, business development

EHM September 2012 Newsletter

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Mon, Sep 10, 2012 @07:52 PM

 
Essential Healthcare Management Newsletter September 2012
The EHM Team: Jeff Hayes

Jeff Hayes

Essential Healthcare Management (EHM) is pleased to have industry healthcare veteran Jeff Hayes as a member of the EHM team. Hayes serves as Executive Vice President.

“We are extremely excited to have Jeff associated with our company.  His reputation, knowledge and success in helping companies grow and improve their national accounts presence and revenue will significantly help our clients to achieve their sales goals and expand market share dramatically,” EHM Managing Partner Stan Schroeder commented.

Hayes brings to EHM a combination of sales, sales management, national accounts and clinical experience to his portfolio of skill sets. His clinical training was accomplished at the University of Kansas Medical Center where he completed a course of study in Mobile Intensive Care Technology.  While working as a Mobile Intensive Care Technician he subsequently earned his BS and MBA from Avila University in Kansas City.

Utilizing both clinical and educational skills, he began working in hospital administration for Humana, Inc. This opportunity provided him with a solid grasp of the issues and concerns that surround the healthcare industry.  He later entered the medical sales arena and began his career in sales at Tri-anim Health Services Inc., the nation’s leading supplier of specialty products for respiratory, anesthesia, EMS, and critical care. Within the Tri-anim organization, he held several management positions, which include Regional Sales Manager, Director of Sales, and Director of National Accounts.  Within that position he created and developed their national accounts initiative.

After leaving Tri-anim, Hayes served as Vice President of National Accounts with Innovative Healthcare Corporation (IHC) – an industry leader in the medical and surgical glove market for both the acute care and alternate site arenas. During his tenure with that organization, IHC was awarded the first ever S2S Agreement by Premier, Inc.

Most recently Hayes held the position of Senior Vice President of National Accounts with StatLab Medical Corporation, a leading supplier of laboratory histology consumables in the acute and non-acute care marketplace. He provided leadership in the design and implementation of their National Accounts program, and continues to represent StatLab in his new role with EHM.

As Executive Vice President at EHM, Hayes is responsible for establishing and cultivating national accounts growth for EHM clients. His focus consists of select niche and specialty product suppliers seeking to become contracted with key GPO’s and IDN’s nationally.

Concussions

By: Rob Bahna, Vice President of Sales, Resuscitation International

The end of summer is upon us, and that means high school football season is starting all over the US. Friday nights for the next several months will create memories and experiences on the gridiron that will never be forgotten. 

I was fortunate to play baseball, hockey and football in high school. I was also fortunate to walk away from my playing days with only minor injuries. I never had a concussion until later in college when a cable snapped on a lat pull-down machine in a gym. 

With all of the stories surrounding concussions, including the long-term damages and suicides of some NFL players, I thought it would be interesting to look at concussions statistics in high school. 

I found an interesting website, momsTEAM, The Trusted Source for Sports Parents that listed the following information: 

Concussion rates have doubled in the last decade - and account for 1 of every 10 sports injuries. 

There are between an estimated 1.6 and 3.8 million sports related concussions in the US every year leading the Center for Disease Control to conclude that sports concussions in the US have reached an "epidemic level." 

As you would expect, football players are the most at risk with at least one player sustaining a mild concussion in nearly every American football game. 

Girls soccer players are the second most at risk for concussions of all other high school sports. 

There are approximately 67,000 diagnosed concussions in high school football players every year. 

According to the New York Times, at least 50 youth football players (high school or younger) from 20 different states have died or sustained serious head injuries on the field since 1997. 

Once an athlete has suffered an initial concussion, his or her chances of a second one are 3 to 6 times greater than an athlete who has never sustained a concussion. 

Athletes keep getting bigger, stronger and faster. When I graduated from high school, it was rare for even an NFL player to be 300 pounds, and now high school lineman weigh that much. Our awareness and ability to detect these injuries much better obviously impacts the increase in numbers.

I am a firm believer that sports play an integral part in shaping lives. The teamwork, dedication, discipline, competition, hard work, time management, handling of pressure, learning to win and lose, self-confidence and relationships developed are skills that can last a lifetime. 

Given the choice between two job candidates if all else were fairly equal, if one were an athlete in college, I know many hiring managers who would choose the athlete because of the experiences that person had. 

We should continue to look for ways to make athletics safer and increase our own knowledge about what can be done to prevent injuries. However, we need to be careful how far we go. 

"Fear defeats more people than any other one thing in the world. "

- Ralph Waldo Emerson  

Client News

New Clients
Essential Healthcare Management recently joined forced with eDocument Solutions, LLC (eDocs4MDs). Please check out eDocs4MDs website to learn more.  

MedAssets Technology Forum
Genadyne Biotechnologies, SunClean, and Cayenne Medical have been selected to participate in the MedAssets Technology & Innovation ForumSuppliers must be selected by MedAssets to receive an invitation based on quality and caliber of products and services, innovativeness of the product or service in the healthcare market, customer suggestions and other selection criteria

Please check out our clients' websites for more information on their product lines.

The Optime Group
Ed Hisscock, President of The Optime Group, moderates "How Supply Chain Impacts Patient Experience" at the Fall 2012 IDN Summit.

EHM News

Essential Healthcare Management Official Fall 2012 IDN Summit Sponsor!

EHM embraces the great privilege of participating in the upcoming Fall 2012 IDN Summit in Scottsdale, AZ as a Silver Sponsor. We feel motivated, energetic, and enthusiastic about the endless possibilities that lie ahead.  Please look for us and the following 22 of our client companies in Scottsdale!

Upcoming Conference Schedule

We hope to see you soon!

You can always find us at www.essentialhm.net

Essential Healthcare Management
Dallas, TX
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Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, Schroeder, Essential Healthcare, integrated delivery networks, Frank Ripullo, business growth, strategic thinking, business development

More Important to Be Kind Than Clever

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Wed, Aug 29, 2012 @12:10 PM

One of the more heart-warming stories to zoom around the Internet lately involves a young man, his dying grandmother, and a bowl of clam chowder from Panera Bread. It's a little story that offers big lessons about service, brands, and the human side of business — a story that underscores why efficiency should never come at the expense of humanity.

The story, as told in AdWeek, goes like this: Brandon Cook, from Wilton, New Hampshire, was visiting his grandmother in the hospital. Terribly ill with cancer, she complained to her grandson that she desperately wanted a bowl of soup, and that the hospital's soup was inedible (she used saltier language). If only she could get a bowl of her favorite clam chowder from Panera Bread! Trouble was, Panera only sells clam chowder on Friday. So Brandon called the nearby Panera and talked to store manager Suzanne Fortier. Not only did Sue make clam chowder especially for Brandon's grandmother, she included a box of cookies as a gift from the staff.

It was a small act of kindness that would not normally make headlines. Except that Brandon told the story on his Facebook page, and Brandon's mother, Gail Cook, retold the story on Panera's fan page. The rest, as they say, is social-media history. Gail's post generated 500,000 (and counting) "likes" and more than 22,000 comments on Panera's Facebook page. Panera, meanwhile, got something that no amount of traditional advertising can buy — a genuine sense of affiliation and appreciation from customers around the world.

Marketing types have latched on to this story as an example of the power of social media and "virtual word-of-mouth" to boost a company's reputation. But I see the reaction to Sue Fortier's gesture as an example of something else — the hunger among customers, employees, and all of us to engage with companies on more than just dollars-and-cents terms. In a world that is being reshaped by the relentless advance of technology, what stands out are acts of compassion and connection that remind us what it means to be human.

As I read the story of Brandon and his grandmother, I thought back to a lecture delivered two years ago by Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon.com, to the graduating seniors of my alma mater, Princeton University. Bezos is nothing if not a master of technology — he has built his company, and his fortune, on the rise of the Internet and his own intellect. But he spoke that day not about computing power or brainpower, but about his grandmother — and what he learned when he made her cry.

Even as a 10-year-old boy, it turns out, Bezos had a steel-trap mind and a passion for crunching numbers. During a summer road trip with his grandparents, young Jeff got fed up with his grandmother's smoking in the car — and decided to do something about it. From the backseat, he calculated how many cigarettes per day his grandmother smoked, how many puffs she took per cigarette, the health risk of each puff, and announced to her with great fanfare, "You've taken nine years off your life!"

Bezos's calculations may have been accurate — but the reaction was not what he expected. His grandmother burst into tears. His grandfather pulled the car off to the side of the road and asked young Jeff to step out. And then his grandfather taught a lesson that this now-billionaire decided to share the with the Class of 2010: "My grandfather looked at me, and after a bit of silence, he gently and calmly said, 'Jeff, one day you'll understand that it's harder to be kind than clever.'"

That's a lesson I wish more businesspeople understood — a lesson that is reinforced by the reaction to this simple act of kindness at Panera Bread. Indeed, I experienced something similar not so long ago, and found it striking enough to devote an HBR blog post to the experience. In my post, I told the story of my father, his search for a new car, a health emergency that took place in the middle of that search — and a couple of extraordinary (and truly human) gestures by an auto dealer that put him at ease and won his loyalty.

"What is it about business that makes it so hard to be kind?" I asked at the time. "And what kind of businesspeople have we become when small acts of kindness feel so rare?"

That's what's really striking about the Panera Bread story — not that Suzanne Fortier went out of her way to do something nice for a sick grandmother, but that her simple gesture attracted such global attention and acclaim.

So by all means, encourage your people to embrace technology, get great at business analytics, and otherwise ramp up the efficiency of everything they do. But just make sure all their efficiency doesn't come at the expense of their humanity. Small gestures can send big signals about who we are, what we care about, and why people should want to affiliate with us. It's harder (and more important) to be kind than clever.

Shared by Bill Taylor

Tags: leadership, marketing, teamwork, brand management, sales, business growth, strategic thinking, business development

Wish You Well

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, May 15, 2012 @11:06 AM

As an avid reader, I appreciate it when others share learning opportunities that they occasionally find from unique and outstanding books. Many of you may be familiar with David Baldacci, the best selling author of many books about politics, spies and intrigue. If not, his books are some of my favorite from the action based fiction category. However, it was one of his that I came across recently that is one that I hope you pick up - and give to your children if you have them.

The book, called Wish You Well, is actually required reading in school districts throughout the country. It tells the story of twelve year old Louisa Mae Cardinal and her tranisition from New York city of 1940, to living in the Virginia mountains with her great-grandmother on her farm.

My mother grew up on a farm with 9 siblings in Ohio. And some of this book and story relates to me in this way. But the other thing that Baldacci points out is that we really don't take the time to learn even about our families and take advantage of that history.

But, Baldacci says it much better than I can. Here are some quotes from various parts of the book:

“Unfortunately, we live in a time where everyone seems to be solely looking ahead, as though we deem nothing in the past worthy of our attention. The future is always fresh and exciting, and it has a pull on us that times past simply can never muster. Yet it may be our greatest wealth as human beings can be “discovered” by simply looking behind us.” David Baldacci in his author’s note for the book “Wish You Well”.

“One’s courage, hope and spirit can be severely tried by the happenstance of life. But as I learned on that Virginia mountain, as long as one never loses faith, it is impossible to ever truly be alone.”

“I hope that once you close the last page of Wish You Well, you will want to journey through the past of your own family, to learn the things you never knew before – stories of love, sadness, loss or happiness. These emotions are innately human, and they forge the bands of shared experiences that connect us all. In fact, these connections, both large and small, over time are what constitute our humanity.”

William Faulkner once wrote, “The past is never dead, it’s not even past.”

As a business leader, one of my goals is to always really learn about the people I work with. But then I stop and think, how much can I still learn about from those people I have known for years?

My grandparents never had a computer or cell phone, let alone an Ipad. As a matter of fact they had a shared phone line that you had to wait for the neighbors to finish talking before you could make a call. I don't believe they ever flew on an airplane. Their home did not have central air or heat. We thought we would freeze when we were sleeping upstairs. They worked their farm for 15 plus hours each day and hoped the weather cooperated. By all accounts - they had a difficult life. It would be a shame not to learn from it.

But I have to put down my cell phone and Ipad to do it....

Pick up the book. You will not be sorry.

Have a great week.

Rob Bahna

Tags: selling, leadership, leader, sales, Management, business development

Don't let the Senate outsource your job to China!

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Mon, Apr 30, 2012 @01:51 PM

We need your signature to help defeat an innovation-crushing 2.3% medical devices tax slated for January 2013.

It’s an election year. Your signature may persuade the Senate to repeal this ill-conceived measure, estimated to offshore 43,000 American jobs.

Click the link for more information...

http://no2point3.com/

Tags: selling, healthcare suppliers, outsourcing model, market forecasting, sales, business growth, business development

Winning

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, Apr 10, 2012 @12:14 PM

I have been involved in hiring hundreds of sales people and managers in my career. Not once during the interviews for these jobs did any candidate say, "I want to lose" or "I don't care about winning".
 
Every one of us says we want to win - and I believe that is true. So why do we have people who continually succeed despite the challenges that are put in front of them and others who effectively give up the day the goal or quota is assigned?
 
In some ways I believe it is about really having the Will to win. Coach Bobby Knight once said that "the will to win is not nearly as important as the will to prepare to win."
 
Let's use presentations as an example. When you give a presentation to a customer, your own team or even in public, you know going in how well prepared you are and how much work you have done to be ready. If you are completely confident because your preparation has been flawless, it is apparent to everyone who hears you.
 
We have all been on the other end of a presentation where someone was not prepared because they did not own the material. I certainly don't want someone reading slides to me instead of having an engaged conversation whenever possible.
 
When I started selling very few people had cell phones, email was just starting and people actually didn't answer their phones or text during the meetings. And unless it was a doctor, very rarely did anyone interrupt a meeting that was taking place.
 
But just as those thing change - so has our ability to prepare with the data and knowledge that is readily available on companies and people. Can you imagine asking the president of a company "what does your organization do"? Yet - many people are not prepared to ask intelligent questions and show that they have done their homework. Every person we deal with wants us to be prepared and show them that we value their time.
 
If you watch cooking shows, it is easy to see the finished meal and say - wow, that is great. But it doesn't happen without practice and repetition, preparation and hard work.
 
It's not what you want, but what you do that matters. Everyone wants to win. Some people choose to.

Have a great week.
 
Rob Bahna

Vice President of Sales
Rescuscitation International

Tags: selling, leadership, determination, teamwork, leader, sales, business growth, strategic thinking, business development

The Relationship Curve

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 @01:23 PM



Amy Hardin

SELLect Sales

www.sellectsales.com

Tags: selling, leadership, sales, business growth, Management, strategic thinking, business development

Spring Training

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Thu, Mar 08, 2012 @12:29 PM

Here we are getting ready to start the 2012 Major League Baseball season with another Spring Training under way. You can almost smell the fresh cut grass, hot dogs, peanuts and taste the cold beer as the warm sun hits your face.


Each year these elite players spend weeks getting ready to do the one thing that they have been doing all their lives - playing baseball. And then the regular season lasts for 162 games followed by the playoffs.

The following numbers are provided by the NCAA about the chances of being drafted by a major league baseball team (this is not making the majors - but just being drafted so the real odds are worse).

--High school senior players who go on to play NCAA men`s baseball: Less than three in 50, or 5.6 percent

-- NCAA senior players drafted by a Major League Baseball (MLB) team: Less than eleven in 100, or 10.5 percent.

-- High school senior players eventually drafted by an MLB team: About one in 200, or 0.5 percent. Drafted baseball players almost always go to a minor league team. These teams abound; there are over 150 of them, compared to 30 in the majors. The big leagues have 750 players, yet the 2004 draft alone took 1,500. Hence some estimate that only one in 33 minor leaguers ever makes it to the pros. If that's correct, the chance of a high school player making the big leagues is one in 6,600, or 0.015 percent. That's roughly the chance of a thief guessing your PIN number on the first try

Why then do these elite players - the millionaires, the best of the best, who have been doing this their entire life focus on the fundamentals and basics in Spring Training? The answer is, of course, that to make that elite team it takes tremendous talent and skill. But at that level it also takes hard work and effort to be the best of the best - just like in any field.

How often are you practicing, evaluating and working on your skills and that of your team? How much do you spend making your team better?

In today's major leagues, players spend countless hours studying videotapes to try to gain a competitive advantage on the competition in any way that they can. That includes video of themselves and what they are doing well and need to improve upon. Do you? Are you studying what your competition is doing?

Show me a person who knows it all, and I will show you someone who I don't want on my team. Show me someone who has had success, and wants to continue improving and working to continue that success - and always find a better way, and I will show you a superstar.

Have a great week.

Rob Bahna

Vice President of Sales
Rescuscitation International

Tags: selling, leadership, teamwork, leader, sales, business growth, Management, business development