The Catalyst … accelerating business growth in healthcare

EHM Announces Thomas Hickey as Senior Consultant

Posted by Jessica Hartman on Wed, Sep 21, 2016 @10:41 AM

Essential Healthcare Management (EHM) Appoints Thomas Hickey as Senior Consultant

Orange County, CA – EHM has named Thomas Hickey to the position of senior consultant. Hickey’s national accounts client roster will include Avancen, the manufacturer of the MOD® Oral PCA Device and MODTrac™Database, a medication on-demand system for hospitals and healthcare professionals. Along with physician preference tools, Hickey will focus on manufacturing clients in the OR, biologics, and, medical surgical sectors.

“Thomas’ knowledge of the national accounts landscape and phenomenal track record in sales, management and distribution, make him a strong asset,” said Frank Ripullo, MA, Founder and Managing Partner of EHM. “Having worked at one of the largest GPOs, Thomas’ addition provides our client’s with prime national accounts knowledge gained from his GPO-side experience.”

Hickey, a thirty year medical sales veteran, comes with vast industry experience including running a large scale distribution company, executive management roles, and a leadership position at a national group purchasing organization, Amerinet, now Intalere. He has held a variety of executive roles with leading companies including, MicroAire Surgical Instruments, Sybermed, Inc and Draeger. He has served on the board of American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN), giving him insight into the challenges facing clinical medicine.

“I am excited to bring my expertise in sales and distribution processes and go-to-market strategies for new products and the development of “blue ocean strategies” for existing products to both current and new clients contracting with the sophisticated team at EHM,” remarked Hickey.

Hickey holds a Master’s Degree in Health Economics from Eastern Michigan University and a B.S in Business Management from Oakland University.

ABOUT ESSENTIAL HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT, INC.

EHM is the leader in partnering with medical industry suppliers to promote growth by aligning corporate accounts strategies to advance business activity, securing an increase in domestic and global sales for its clients. EHM’s lean and fast approach serves a variety of suppliers enjoying market access and contract uptake through GPOs, IDNs, RPCs. To facilitate rapid growth, EHM retains an unparalleled network of senior executives. Services include national accounts management, growth planning, contract negotiations, sales, and, marketplace assessment. For more information, call 949-842-2520.

 

Contact:

Essential Healthcare Management, Inc.

Jessica Hartman

Director of Business Development

Jessica@essentialhm.net

(704) 574-2131

 

 

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, EHM, healthcare, GPO, sales, Expertise, National accounts

HealthTrust Awards Uresil with Peripheral Interventional Drain Catheter Agreement

Posted by Jessica Hartman on Thu, Nov 20, 2014 @11:13 AM

HealthTrust Awards UreSil with Peripheral Interventional Drain Catheter Agreement

SKOKIE, ILLINOIS -- NOVEMBER 20th, 2014

Effective December 1, 2014, HealthTrust will award an agreement for Peripheral Interventional Drain Catheters to UreSil. When asked for comment, Brett Hazuka, vice president of Domestic Sales for UreSil replied, “It is an honor to work with HealthTrust and we look forward to a mutually beneficial relationship between UreSil and HealthTrust’s member network. We have always admired the way that HealthTrust does business and it is great to have an opportunity to provide our products through the HealthTrust relationship.”

About UreSil

UreSil develops, manufactures, and distributes interventional radiology and vascular products that serve the needs of physicians who perform minimally invasive procedures.

About HealthTrust

HealthTrust (legally known as HealthTrust Purchasing Group, L.P.) is committed to strengthening provider performance and clinical excellence through an aligned membership model and the delivery of total cost management solutions, including supply chain solutions and a contract and service portfolio unparalleled in quality, scope and value. HealthTrust (www.healthtrustpg.com) serves nearly 1,400 acute care facilities, 800 ambulatory surgery centers and members in more than 10,600 other locations, including physician practices, long-term care and alternate care sites. Headquartered in Brentwood, Tennessee, HealthTrust is closely integrated with the proven capabilities of Parallon Business Solutions, LLC (www.parallon.com), a leading provider of healthcare business and operational services, including revenue cycle management, workforce and technology solutions. On Twitter @healthtrustpg and @parallonconnect.

Please contact Marlena Jakusz (MarlenaJ@UreSil.com) for media or other inquiries

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, Schroeder, Essential Healthcare, EHM, healthcare, gpos, GPO, uresil

Quotient Biodiagnostics and EHM

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, Jan 08, 2013 @08:50 AM

DALLAS – January 08, 2013 – (EHM) a healthcare business consulting firm, was chosen by Quotient Biodiagnostics to help secure contracts with group purchasing organizations, integrated delivery networks, and regional purchasing coalitions across the United States.

EHM is a healthcare business development firm, creating demand for the products and services of leading medical suppliers.   The group combines corporate accounts strategy and operational infrastructure to meet the needs of their clients.  The EHM Team brings over 100 years of healthcare experience to the table and is fully dedicated to changing healthcare for the better.

Quotient Biodiagnostics is a leading blood transfusion products company whose primary focus is to provide top quality blood banking reagents directly to the manual user worldwide. Quotient manufacturers and distributes over 200 products and sells worldwide in over 30 countries.

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, healthcare, healthcare suppliers, gpos, IDNs, integrated delivery networks, GPO

Pulmodyne News: Novation Awards Innovative Technology Agreement to Product that Gives Patients the Ability to Speak

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Wed, Sep 19, 2012 @11:46 AM

Novation Awards Innovative Technology Agreement to Product that Gives Patients the Ability to Speak

Pulmodyne’s innovative Tracheostomy Tube System also enhances patient safety!

IRVING, TX; September 19, 2012 – Novation, the leading health care supply chain expertise and contracting company for the members of VHA Inc., UHC, Children’s Hospital Association, and Provista LLC, today announced that it has awarded an agreement to Pulmodyne for their Blom® cuffed tracheostomy tubes through Novation’s innovative technology evaluation process. 

The Blom® tracheostomy tube system is an innovative solution that allows patients the ability to speak in their own natural voice, even though they are ventilator-dependent patients with a tracheostomy. The Blom tracheostomy tube system has a unique subglottic suctioning disposable inner cannula that gives the clinician the ability to perform suctioning above the cuff of a tracheostomy tube, which will help them in their strategy to fight ventilator acquired pneumonia (VAP).  

Novation’s Innovative Technology Program allows Novation to work with member councils and task forces to identify and review new or innovative technology that provides an incremental clinical benefit over existing products.  Since 2003, more than 500 new and innovative technologies have been reviewed through Novation’s Innovative Technology Program.

“Our goal with the Program is to work with hospital members to identify innovative technology that improves patient care or reduces the risk of harm to patients or providers, while simultaneously raising the standard of patient care and safety,” said Debbie Archer, director, procurement and innovative technology, Novation.  “Many exciting advancements are occurring in health care technology, and we are committed to providing visibility into the latest innovations.”

About Novation, Winner of the Ethics Inside® Certification

Founded in 1998, Novation is the leading health care supply chain expertise and contracting company for the more than 65,000 members of VHA Inc. and UHC, two national health care alliances, Children’s Hospital Association, an alliance of the nation’s leading pediatric facilities, and Provista, LLC. Novation provides alliance members with sourcing services, as well as information and data services. Based in Irving, Texas, Novation develops and manages competitive contracts with more than 600 suppliers. VHA, UHC, and Provista members used Novation contracts to purchase more than $40 billion in 2011. Novation recently earned the coveted Ethics Inside® Certification from Ethisphere Institute, a leading international think tank dedicated to the research and promotion of best practices in corporate ethics and compliance.  Novation was also named on Ethisphere’s World’s Most Ethical Companies list, and is the only company in the health care industry to earn both distinctions.  To learn more about Novation, please visit www.novationco.com and follow @NovationNews.

About Pulmodyne

Founded in 1985, Pulmodyne has grown to be a leader in innovative respiratory products. The company’s portfolio includes the O2 – RESQ Immediate CPAP System, the Blom Tracheostomy Tube System, and BiTrac NIV and HC Masks and Accessories. Since its inception the company has operated as a privately held corporation. For more information, please visit www.pulmodyne.com

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, healthcare, GPO, Novation

EHM and SunClean

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Fri, Aug 03, 2012 @04:34 PM

ESSENTIAL HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT SELECTED BY SUNCLEAN LLC, TO PROPEL GPO, IDN, AND RPC PENETRATION STRATEGY

DALLAS – July 11, 2012 – (EHM), a healthcare business consulting firm, was chosen by SunClean LLC,  manufacturers and distributors of the SunClean150 Solar/Battery Powered Trash Compactor,  to help secure contracts with group purchasing organizations, integrated delivery networks, and regional purchasing coalitions across the United States.  SunClean150 is a patented compacting trash receptacle good for indoor or outdoor use that is completely self-powered. SunClean150 uses solar/battery power for 100% of its energy needs. The units’ footprint is the same as an ordinary receptacle but its capacity is five times greater. This means fewer collection trips, less fuel use and reduced greenhouse gas emissions.  The SunClean also provides cost efficiencies from labor and maintenance savings, and offers a range of environmental benefits. It can be solar or battery powered and is safe, easy to use, and designed to keep out pests. SunClean looks great, and is a true energy-smart choice.

EHM is a healthcare business development firm, creating demand for the products and services of leading medical suppliers.   The group combines corporate accounts strategy and operational infrastructure to meet the needs of their clients.  The EHM Team brings over 100 years of healthcare experience to the table and is fully dedicated to changing healthcare for the better.

SunClean is a Certified Minority Owned Business providing earth-friendly cleaning products, equipment, and systems for a wide variety of industrial and commercial cleaning and waste management applications. SunClean’s automatic recycling systems can be found throughout the Continental United States and abroad.

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, Schroeder, healthcare, healthcare suppliers, business growth

EHM and Pulmodyne

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Thu, Aug 02, 2012 @01:48 PM

ESSENTIAL HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT SELECTED BY PULMODYNE, INC. TO PROPEL GPO, IDN, AND RPC PENETRATION STRATEGY

DALLAS – July 11, 2012 – (EHM) a healthcare business consulting firm, was chosen by Pulmodyne, Inc. to help secure contracts with group purchasing organizations, integrated delivery networks, and regional purchasing coalitions across the United States.

EHM is a healthcare business development firm, creating demand for the products and services of leading medical suppliers.   The group combines corporate accounts strategy and operational infrastructure to meet the needs of their clients.  The EHM Team brings over 100 years of healthcare experience to the table and is fully dedicated to changing healthcare for the better.

Pulmodyne, Inc. is an ISO certified manufacturer of medical devices for anesthesia, respiratory, emergency, nuclear medicine, drug delivery and other products.  Since 1985, Pulmodyne has developed and produced a wide range of proprietary products for direct distribution worldwide.

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, healthcare, healthcare suppliers, sales

The Supreme Court Ruling, and What it Means for Purchasing Patterns Moving Forward

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Fri, Jun 29, 2012 @12:29 PM

The Supreme Court Ruling, and What it Means for Purchasing Patterns Moving Forward

The Supreme Court on Thursday largely upheld the constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, including the individual health-insurance mandate, ruling it is permissible under Congress's taxing authority. The court did find one part of the law unconstitutional, according to the Wall Street Journal, saying its expansion of the federal-state Medicaid program threatened states' existing funding. The court ruled that the federal government can't put sanctions on states' existing Medicaid funding if the states decline to go along with the Medicaid expansion, the Journal reported.  

What this means for the industry:

• Hospitals will continue to chase cost savings. For buyers, the stakes are higher than ever for understanding the supply chain and where those dollars go. The Association for Healthcare Resource & Materials Management (AHRMM) (Chicago, IL) reports that, on a per-case basis, as much as 31 cents of every dollar spent by providers is for supplies associated with care. In other words, these costs are second only to the cost of labor for hospitals. With such a huge proportion of provider expenditures going toward supplies and services, the opportunities for cost-savings are enormous (Excerpt fromMuddy Waters - Making Sense of the Healthcare Supply Chain in the Era of Reform)

• Quality will be an ever important measurement that affects reimbursement rates. IDNs, hospitals and physicians will have to demonstrate how they are providing quality care for reimbursement in general and also the potential of shared savings. Benchmarks and performance will be compared, and the difference between the two will be the amount of money that is the potential for shared savings. 

• Patient experience will become critical in the value equation. Fee for service is being replaced by a holistic approach to care. Quality care will boil down to outcomes-based medicine.

From MDSI

Tags: healthcare, hospitals, Accountable Care Organizations, healthcare suppliers, HHS Regulations, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, ACA, Afforable Care Act

Emerging Trends in Gastroenterology Reimbursement Lower Payments, Larger Health Care Organizations Likely To Come

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, Nov 08, 2011 @10:24 AM

Chicago—As the effects of the Affordable Care Act begin to take shape, it’s clear that physicians will experience a different future regarding reimbursement. In particular, gastroenterologists can expect shared savings programs, bundled payments and re-valued gastrointestinal (GI) procedural codes to directly impact their pay in the years to come, according to economic and policy experts.

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) are responsible for implementing the new rules and programs. For example, in April, CMS proposed to create accountable care organizations (ACOs), which are groups of coordinated health care providers that agree to be accountable for the overall cost and care of a Medicare patient population and that are willing to tie their reimbursement to quality improvements that reduce overall costs.

Likewise in May, CMS announced its final rule on implementing the Hospital Inpatient Value-Based Purchasing program, which will use a “mix of standards, process, outcomes, and patient experience measures” to score hospitals “on their overall achievement relative to national or other appropriate benchmarks.” The agency said it “will make value-based incentive payments to acute care hospitals, based either on how well the hospitals perform on certain quality measures” or on how much the hospitals’ performance improves after a baseline period. Eventually, the program will likely extend to the level of the individual physician. The HHS stated that the scoring program may be used by “consumers … to make meaningful distinctions among providers’ performance.”

Health Care Market Realignment

By tying reimbursement to quality metrics, the new programs will create newer, larger health care entities and a shift from fee-for-service to flat payments to physicians.

“The Affordable Care Act is trying to bring back risk for what we do and for whom we are accountable to,” said Lawrence Kosinski, MD, MBA, a managing partner of the Illinois Gastroenterology Group, in Elgin, and chair of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute’s Practice Management and Economics Committee.

One response to these developing changes has been to pool the new risk. “From a macro point of view, the provider side is aggregating. You see hospitals aggregating, you see physician groups aggregating, and you see hospital and physician groups [integrating]. Why are they doing this? To get large enough to handle the risk of a population of people,” said Dr. Kosinski.

These seismic shifts are integrating physician groups on a smaller scale, and health care organizations and ACOs on a larger scale. Dr. Kosinski recently merged his practice with two other Chicago-area gastroenterology practices, and now has added a fourth to compete on a regional level and control costs.

On the grander scale, hospital systems are purchasing physician practices.

“Gastroenterology is becoming an employed specialty,” said Joel Brill, MD, the chief medical officer of Predictive Health, in Phoenix, and former chair of the AGA’s Practice Management and Economics Committee. “With one in five gastroenterologists already in employed settings, the number will continue to grow.”

Dr. Kosinski added, “Physicians will not be on fee-for-service; rather, they will have fixed incomes with performance bonuses based on balanced scorecards.”

A recent survey by the Medical Group Management Association shows a nearly 75% increase in the number of physicians employed by hospitals since 2000. Hospital-owned physician practices now outnumber those owned by physicians themselves.

In May, Robert Kocher, MD, former special assistant to President Obama for health care, laid out the reason in an editorial in The New England Journal of Medicine. In addition to primary care physicians, hospitals are now aggressively targeting specialists in order to create “what could effectively become closed, integrated health care delivery systems.” These larger systems not only control pricing power—a Virginia hospital system reportedly charged four to 10 times as much for a colonoscopy as providers in similar, separate markets—but they can also “reduce excess costs associated with unnecessary practice variation.”

Or as Dr. Brill puts it: “He who writes your check will decide what you do.” The big question in this scenario is not whether screening colonoscopy is reimbursed at $1,200 or $2,500, but whether the procedure needs to be done at all, he said. If hospitals employ both primary care and specialist physicians, hospitals effectively control primary care referral patterns for all GI services, which could impact gastroenterologists regardless of whether they spend their time performing office consultations or procedures.

Bundled Payments

In addition to encouraging salaried employment from hospitals and promoting joint ventures between a gastroenterologist and a local hospital, the health reform act will alter GI physicians’ reimbursement by establishing a bundled payment program through Medicare. The program will set a flat fee for “an episode of care,” only for those events requiring hospitalization.

Because screening colonoscopy, for example, is primarily a diagnostic procedure, the bundled payment system will likely not be as complicated for gastroenterologists as it could be for physicians managing chronic conditions in a fixed-fee system. However, physicians with ambulatory surgery centers will have to scrutinize their practice to see where they can increase savings.

“A lot of what gastroenterologists do today are services that are diagnostic and therapeutic as opposed to [those that manage] chronic conditions,” said Dr. Brill. “Where bundled payments could possibly impact us is that if you perform a colonoscopy and have a complication, such as a bleed or the patient has to be brought back because of a poor prep, this could affect what you and the facility get paid for the second procedure. Then you’ve got to figure out how you’re going to spend your money.”

“Right now, if we do a screening colonoscopy and find a polyp, there is no control over when the patient returns for a surveillance colonoscopy,” said Dr. Kosinski. “We may bring them back in three years even if it is not appropriate according to guidelines. What’s coming and what I’ve seen is that the payers are going to give physicians something like a gift card—you’ve got $1,500 for your screening colonoscopy—and the GIs are going to say, ‘Maybe I can use conscious sedation, maybe I don’t want that anesthesia expense,’ and hold on to as much of that dollar as they can. When we get down to the nitty gritty, you will have screening and surveillance done at a fixed cost for the package of the procedure.”

Procedure Reimbursement

By far the most significant effect of health care reform will be on procedure reimbursement, both facility and professional fees. Four years ago, CMS began to phase in a new ASC fee schedule as the result of a Congressional mandate that the schedules should align with payments to hospital outpatient departments. However, the mandate stipulated that the changes in spending across ASCs remain budget-neutral, with the result that ASC fees for GI services fell approximately 25%, said Glenn Littenberg, MD, the managing partner of Gastroenterology Associates, in Pasadena, Calif., and chair of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy’s (ASGE) Practice Management Committee.

“One of the big issues is the trend in [ASC] reimbursement for GI endoscopy, which is really a continuation of the trend that began a few years ago,” said Dr. Littenberg, who is also currently the ASGE’s adviser to the American Medical Association (AMA) Current Procedural Terminology editorial panel. “Reimbursement for the facility side from Medicare for screening colonoscopy has now fallen to about or below the level at which the services can be provided. While CMS wants to have effective care delivered in quality facilities and to improve rates of screening for colorectal cancer, its payment policy undermines this [goal].”

The effect on professional fees reflects a change in how CMS is dealing with the recommendations of the AMA’s Relative Value Scale Update Committee (RUC), which makes annual recommendations to CMS on reimbursement rates for physician services. Every five years, the RUC also performs a broader review of the entire Resource-Based Relative Value Scale. Until this year, CMS accepted the vast majority of the RUC’s recommendations and largely left the RUC to determine which physician services to re-value. However, the Affordable Care Act specifically calls for the CMS to have greater scrutiny over reimbursement rates.

“The key thing is Section 3134, which requires the secretary [of HHS] to review and identify potentially misvalued codes,” said Dr. Brill, who is the AGA’s RUC adviser. “For years, CMS pretty much accepted what the RUC recommended—but that’s no more.”

For example, in the 2011 Physician Fee Schedule Proposed Rule, CMS specifically pointed to several GI codes that it believes are misvalued and need to be surveyed for 2011, including upper GI endoscopy diagnosis and biopsy, colonoscopy and biopsy, and colonoscopy and polypectomy.

“Medicare has challenged the GI societies to defend their reimbursement for our bread-and-butter procedures,” Dr. Brill said.

Clearly, CMS wants to be much more aggressive in how they evaluate the physician workload behind a service, said Dr. Littenberg. “We are going to be challenged to defend the values that we believe are pertinent to our services. The outcome may well be that reimbursement for services will fall, because it’s almost impossible to increase the value within a budget-neutral system that is not keeping up with inflation.”

In the future, the Affordable Care Act also calls for the creation of the Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB), an executive-branch agency charged specifically with reducing the Medicare growth rate. Importantly, HHS must implement the board’s proposals unless Congress adopts equally effective alternatives; the only way to avoid this would be if both houses of Congress, including a three-fifths super majority in the Senate, vote to waive the requirement. Importantly, however, the IPAB is strictly limited in what it can do to slow Medicare costs: The board cannot ration health care, raise revenues or increase Medicare beneficiary premiums, meaning that physician fees become a likely target for curbing costs.

“The way that the legislation is written, it puts physician fees very much up front in the efforts of the IPAB because they have so many restrictions on what else they can do,” said Dr. Littenberg. “It doesn’t leave much [to cut] besides durable medical equipment, pharmaceutical costs and physician services.”

Adapting to Health Care Reform

Physicians who hope to adapt to these myriad changes need to be able to prove their value and then position their practice to work with others to find savings.

In terms of collecting data, physicians have to ask, “How is this going to result in a benefit or recognition for me,” said Dr. Brill. “As a physician, you should be asking that question very critically—how are the data going to translate into an incentive? Will my fees go up? Will I get paid in a more timely manner? Will co-pays to me get reduced or disappear? Will I be freed from having to submit requests for pre-authorization?”

Whether gastroenterologists are collecting data through an electronic medical record system, an endoscopy reporting program or a registry, the data should align with the outcome measures that Medicare and payers want to see, Dr. Brill said.

Gastroenterologists also need to recognize the power structure within their community and make an effort to find partners.

“More than the government, our biggest threat is the local hospitals, who have the ability to change everyday practice a lot more than the government does,” said Dr. Kosinski. “They are forming very, very large, powerful networks and they are buying the primary care base and employing the people that send us business. So my best advice is ‘do not declare war on your hospital.’ And, do not feel like you have to sell your practice to your hospital. Look to pursue ways of being engaged with your local hospital and your local medical community. Don’t spend your entire day in your ASC. You can’t survive if you spend your life just cranking the colons. You’ve got to work with your hospital, joint-venture with them, and stay engaged with your primary care base.”


Dr. Kosinski reported no relevant financial or other commercial relationship with any manufacturer or provider of products or services relevant to this article. Dr. Littenberg reported financial or other commercial relationships with Abbott Laboratories. Dr. Brill reported financial or other commercial relationships with Avantis Medical Systems, BARRX Medical, Inc., Boston Scientific Corporation, Centocor, Inc., Early Bird Alert, Inc., EndoChoice, Inc., Given Imaging, Novartis Pharmaceuticals, Salix Pharmaceuticals, Inc., SciDose, SmartPill, Spectra Science and USGI.

 


Written By: Gabriel Miller

Tags: healthcare, ACO, healthcare suppliers, ACO Regulations, ACOs and suppliers, medical devices, Healthcare Service Provider, ACA, Afforable Care Act

Referrals

Posted by Stan Schroeder on Tue, Sep 20, 2011 @12:48 PM

We all know how important and valuable referrals are to our business, both short and long term. Several industries survive on referrals, and they almost always help separate average performers from those at the top of the list in selling success. They will help you get over that quota and earn more.

Like many aspects in selling, the length and depth of your relationships with your customers will likely have an impact on the number of referrals you are getting. If they trust you and believe in your credibility – the risk is minimized in their mind.
 
However, in today’s fast paced selling environment, the most successful sales people are the ones who are actively asking for referrals from as many of their customers as they can. We have all run into situations where we get contact information and give them a call and they say “We just went with a competitor. If only you would have called us last week.”
 
In further developing your own sense of urgency, you need to put asking for referrals on your TO ACCOMPLISH list as an activity that you routinely engage in with your customers. But you will find more success if you sell them on giving your referrals versus simply asking.
 
Answer the question for them of WHY should they give you a referral? Remind them of the positive results and experiences that they have had and get them emotionally involved. I believe people buy on emotion and justify it logically – which is why it is always critical to recreate a portion of that emotion before you ask for something.
 
Kathy, from our conversations it appears that you have been happy with the service that Resuscitation International has provided, and you have told me that our pricing has been very competitive. Is that a fair statement? Great - I am glad to hear that. Do you know of any other departments/services in your area that could benefit from our outstanding prices and service - I am sure they will thank you for it....
 
John, I am glad to hear about the great results you have seen from using the Weil Mini Chest Compressor. You mentioned that the ease of implementation, and consistently providing compressions at the adequate rate and depth, without interruption have resulted in some very positive outcomes. Do you have any colleagues at other departments in the area that you feel might benefit from this device to help them experience similar results in their communities?
 
Sandy, thank you for sharing your experience with the Weil Mini Chest Compressor and how it has helped you streamline your protocols and your training. Obviously, quality CPR sustained over time is a critical link in trying to save these patients, and I am glad you have found the MCC a valuable tool to help accomplish this. Can you think of any other departments or colleagues who you feel would benefit from this great new device?

You may never know exactly why they will give you a referral (maybe they are interviewing at that facility and they want to show how up to date they are on industry trends…). But you won’t get very many if you don’t sell them on it. We all know we should ask for referrals. Like everything in sales – it is not what YOU KNOW, it is WHAT YOU DO that matters.

 
Rob Bahna 
Vice President of Sales
Resuscitation International

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, Schroeder, hard work, EHM, healthcare, medical devices, brand management, referrals, sales, business growth, strategic thinking, business development

Steps of the Sales Call

Posted by Stan Schroeder on Mon, Sep 19, 2011 @11:37 AM

Those of you who have worked with me know that I am a huge believer in becoming a student of the Steps of the Sales Call process. I believe it is the best way to make sure you understand your process so that you can control it (without seeming like you are in control) and improve upon it. If you just wing it - how do you know why you were successful or what you need to do to win the next time?

I have developed my own version of the Steps of the Sales Call - and I believe every call should follow them - no matter how many times you have dealt with that person before. After all -someone else is calling them for the first time...
 
Each step has a purpose - and I know it is important to understand them if you are truly going to commit to using them. Most are designed to build trust and credibility in you and your company, uncover needs and wants, be professional and not miss anything, do a thorough presentation that uses more benefits than features - and ultimately close for commitment.

 

STEPS OF THE CALL
 
Pre-call Planning ACTION WE WANT THE CUSTOMER TO TAKE
Exhaust all possibilities
Be flexible
Ask for Help
Get something done on every call

Primary Objective Established ______
Pricing Available _________
Customer Profile Information _______
Website ________
 

Opening

Good morning _____, this is Rob Bahna with _____. _____ is the company that has supplied you with many of your everyday medical supplies in the past.

I have been working with other ________ departments (or title you are talking to), discussing some ideas that have helped them deal with some of the unique challenges they are facing today. We have seen some outstanding customer satisfaction and positively affected budgets and outcomes.
 
I would like to ask you a few questions to see if some of our solutions might make sense for your department.


Introduction -Establishing Rapport
3-5 Questions about them/qualify decision making
 
I would like verify some of the information I have been able to learn about your facility and make sure I understand them from your perspective as the ____________(title)?

Make sure I have done my homework. The more information I know up front the less invasive my questions are and the higher their confidence level in our professionalism. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER.

 
Ask about them…..

 
I understand you have been a _________ for 5 years. What are the biggest changes you have seen in that time as it relates to how your responsibilities have evolved? Where do you find yourself spending a lot of time where you didn’t use to?
 
Besides yourself, who else do you involve in the important process of purchasing medical supplies and equipment?
 
Sell Your company on every customer contact...
 
Jane, we know it is important for you to know who you are doing business with. ___ has been servicing the emergency medical supply and equipment needs of pre-hospital professionals for ___ years. We have a proven track record of being an industry leader. We are proud to have more than 100,000 agencies and professionals rely on _____.
 
OR  

______, as you are well aware, over the last 10 years we have seen a shift in acuity levels. You are being asked to do higher levels of care in many situations with fewer resources, especially in today’s economy. _____ has been in business for over __ years – and we can help you deal with these challenging times.

 
Determine Your Customer’s Objectives
3-5 Questions About the goals/objectives/qualify product need

Make them stop and think – ask high gain questions that differentiate you and are not only situational. 

1) What Criteria do you use to evaluate your potential suppliers (business partners)?

2) How do you prefer to place your orders?
 
3) Which company do you currently order your supplies from today?
 
Do you order from more than one company?
 
4) Could you please share with me what your experience has been with _____?

If they do not volunteer it – ask them
 
5) It looks like you have not ordered from us in the last ______, could you share with me some of the reasons?
 
 
Engineer Agreement to Demonstrate Product-Program

Lead with 3 Major Benefits
 
________, I appreciate you taking the time to share this information with me. Based on your feedback, and some recent changes we have made(whatever areas kept them from ordering from us – or things they like about others) we believe we can make your job of ordering easier and be very competitive from a price perspective.
 
When do you normally place your supply orders? What do we need to do to earn a shot at your next order?
 
If my pricing is competitive, would there be any other reason that would prevent us from doing business together?

 
3-5 Questions in the Presentation – keep them involved
 
 
Validate & Propose Action
Repeat 3 Major Benefits
 
Trial Close – “In your opinion do you feel…."
 
Close for a Commitment
“The next step is…”

Post-call Planning (Customer Commitment scheduled)
 
Send e-mail with next steps (outline actions they should take)
 
Know your process and become an expert in each phase. After all, it is not what you know, but what you do that is really what is important.

 

Rob Bahna
Vice President of Sales
Resuscitation International

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, EHM, healthcare, medical, healthcare suppliers, Quality, sales, business growth, Management, strategic thinking, business development