The Catalyst … accelerating business growth in healthcare

EHM Announces Thomas Hickey as Senior Consultant

Posted by Jessica Hartman on Wed, Sep 21, 2016 @10:41 AM

Essential Healthcare Management (EHM) Appoints Thomas Hickey as Senior Consultant

Orange County, CA – EHM has named Thomas Hickey to the position of senior consultant. Hickey’s national accounts client roster will include Avancen, the manufacturer of the MOD® Oral PCA Device and MODTrac™Database, a medication on-demand system for hospitals and healthcare professionals. Along with physician preference tools, Hickey will focus on manufacturing clients in the OR, biologics, and, medical surgical sectors.

“Thomas’ knowledge of the national accounts landscape and phenomenal track record in sales, management and distribution, make him a strong asset,” said Frank Ripullo, MA, Founder and Managing Partner of EHM. “Having worked at one of the largest GPOs, Thomas’ addition provides our client’s with prime national accounts knowledge gained from his GPO-side experience.”

Hickey, a thirty year medical sales veteran, comes with vast industry experience including running a large scale distribution company, executive management roles, and a leadership position at a national group purchasing organization, Amerinet, now Intalere. He has held a variety of executive roles with leading companies including, MicroAire Surgical Instruments, Sybermed, Inc and Draeger. He has served on the board of American Association of Critical Care Nurses (AACN), giving him insight into the challenges facing clinical medicine.

“I am excited to bring my expertise in sales and distribution processes and go-to-market strategies for new products and the development of “blue ocean strategies” for existing products to both current and new clients contracting with the sophisticated team at EHM,” remarked Hickey.

Hickey holds a Master’s Degree in Health Economics from Eastern Michigan University and a B.S in Business Management from Oakland University.

ABOUT ESSENTIAL HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT, INC.

EHM is the leader in partnering with medical industry suppliers to promote growth by aligning corporate accounts strategies to advance business activity, securing an increase in domestic and global sales for its clients. EHM’s lean and fast approach serves a variety of suppliers enjoying market access and contract uptake through GPOs, IDNs, RPCs. To facilitate rapid growth, EHM retains an unparalleled network of senior executives. Services include national accounts management, growth planning, contract negotiations, sales, and, marketplace assessment. For more information, call 949-842-2520.

 

Contact:

Essential Healthcare Management, Inc.

Jessica Hartman

Director of Business Development

Jessica@essentialhm.net

(704) 574-2131

 

 

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, EHM, healthcare, GPO, sales, Expertise, National accounts

More Important to Be Kind Than Clever

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Wed, Aug 29, 2012 @12:10 PM

One of the more heart-warming stories to zoom around the Internet lately involves a young man, his dying grandmother, and a bowl of clam chowder from Panera Bread. It's a little story that offers big lessons about service, brands, and the human side of business — a story that underscores why efficiency should never come at the expense of humanity.

The story, as told in AdWeek, goes like this: Brandon Cook, from Wilton, New Hampshire, was visiting his grandmother in the hospital. Terribly ill with cancer, she complained to her grandson that she desperately wanted a bowl of soup, and that the hospital's soup was inedible (she used saltier language). If only she could get a bowl of her favorite clam chowder from Panera Bread! Trouble was, Panera only sells clam chowder on Friday. So Brandon called the nearby Panera and talked to store manager Suzanne Fortier. Not only did Sue make clam chowder especially for Brandon's grandmother, she included a box of cookies as a gift from the staff.

It was a small act of kindness that would not normally make headlines. Except that Brandon told the story on his Facebook page, and Brandon's mother, Gail Cook, retold the story on Panera's fan page. The rest, as they say, is social-media history. Gail's post generated 500,000 (and counting) "likes" and more than 22,000 comments on Panera's Facebook page. Panera, meanwhile, got something that no amount of traditional advertising can buy — a genuine sense of affiliation and appreciation from customers around the world.

Marketing types have latched on to this story as an example of the power of social media and "virtual word-of-mouth" to boost a company's reputation. But I see the reaction to Sue Fortier's gesture as an example of something else — the hunger among customers, employees, and all of us to engage with companies on more than just dollars-and-cents terms. In a world that is being reshaped by the relentless advance of technology, what stands out are acts of compassion and connection that remind us what it means to be human.

As I read the story of Brandon and his grandmother, I thought back to a lecture delivered two years ago by Jeff Bezos, founder and CEO of Amazon.com, to the graduating seniors of my alma mater, Princeton University. Bezos is nothing if not a master of technology — he has built his company, and his fortune, on the rise of the Internet and his own intellect. But he spoke that day not about computing power or brainpower, but about his grandmother — and what he learned when he made her cry.

Even as a 10-year-old boy, it turns out, Bezos had a steel-trap mind and a passion for crunching numbers. During a summer road trip with his grandparents, young Jeff got fed up with his grandmother's smoking in the car — and decided to do something about it. From the backseat, he calculated how many cigarettes per day his grandmother smoked, how many puffs she took per cigarette, the health risk of each puff, and announced to her with great fanfare, "You've taken nine years off your life!"

Bezos's calculations may have been accurate — but the reaction was not what he expected. His grandmother burst into tears. His grandfather pulled the car off to the side of the road and asked young Jeff to step out. And then his grandfather taught a lesson that this now-billionaire decided to share the with the Class of 2010: "My grandfather looked at me, and after a bit of silence, he gently and calmly said, 'Jeff, one day you'll understand that it's harder to be kind than clever.'"

That's a lesson I wish more businesspeople understood — a lesson that is reinforced by the reaction to this simple act of kindness at Panera Bread. Indeed, I experienced something similar not so long ago, and found it striking enough to devote an HBR blog post to the experience. In my post, I told the story of my father, his search for a new car, a health emergency that took place in the middle of that search — and a couple of extraordinary (and truly human) gestures by an auto dealer that put him at ease and won his loyalty.

"What is it about business that makes it so hard to be kind?" I asked at the time. "And what kind of businesspeople have we become when small acts of kindness feel so rare?"

That's what's really striking about the Panera Bread story — not that Suzanne Fortier went out of her way to do something nice for a sick grandmother, but that her simple gesture attracted such global attention and acclaim.

So by all means, encourage your people to embrace technology, get great at business analytics, and otherwise ramp up the efficiency of everything they do. But just make sure all their efficiency doesn't come at the expense of their humanity. Small gestures can send big signals about who we are, what we care about, and why people should want to affiliate with us. It's harder (and more important) to be kind than clever.

Shared by Bill Taylor

Tags: leadership, marketing, teamwork, brand management, sales, business growth, strategic thinking, business development

EHM and Pulmodyne

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Thu, Aug 02, 2012 @01:48 PM

ESSENTIAL HEALTHCARE MANAGEMENT SELECTED BY PULMODYNE, INC. TO PROPEL GPO, IDN, AND RPC PENETRATION STRATEGY

DALLAS – July 11, 2012 – (EHM) a healthcare business consulting firm, was chosen by Pulmodyne, Inc. to help secure contracts with group purchasing organizations, integrated delivery networks, and regional purchasing coalitions across the United States.

EHM is a healthcare business development firm, creating demand for the products and services of leading medical suppliers.   The group combines corporate accounts strategy and operational infrastructure to meet the needs of their clients.  The EHM Team brings over 100 years of healthcare experience to the table and is fully dedicated to changing healthcare for the better.

Pulmodyne, Inc. is an ISO certified manufacturer of medical devices for anesthesia, respiratory, emergency, nuclear medicine, drug delivery and other products.  Since 1985, Pulmodyne has developed and produced a wide range of proprietary products for direct distribution worldwide.

Tags: Essential Healthcare Management, healthcare, healthcare suppliers, sales

Wish You Well

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, May 15, 2012 @11:06 AM

As an avid reader, I appreciate it when others share learning opportunities that they occasionally find from unique and outstanding books. Many of you may be familiar with David Baldacci, the best selling author of many books about politics, spies and intrigue. If not, his books are some of my favorite from the action based fiction category. However, it was one of his that I came across recently that is one that I hope you pick up - and give to your children if you have them.

The book, called Wish You Well, is actually required reading in school districts throughout the country. It tells the story of twelve year old Louisa Mae Cardinal and her tranisition from New York city of 1940, to living in the Virginia mountains with her great-grandmother on her farm.

My mother grew up on a farm with 9 siblings in Ohio. And some of this book and story relates to me in this way. But the other thing that Baldacci points out is that we really don't take the time to learn even about our families and take advantage of that history.

But, Baldacci says it much better than I can. Here are some quotes from various parts of the book:

“Unfortunately, we live in a time where everyone seems to be solely looking ahead, as though we deem nothing in the past worthy of our attention. The future is always fresh and exciting, and it has a pull on us that times past simply can never muster. Yet it may be our greatest wealth as human beings can be “discovered” by simply looking behind us.” David Baldacci in his author’s note for the book “Wish You Well”.

“One’s courage, hope and spirit can be severely tried by the happenstance of life. But as I learned on that Virginia mountain, as long as one never loses faith, it is impossible to ever truly be alone.”

“I hope that once you close the last page of Wish You Well, you will want to journey through the past of your own family, to learn the things you never knew before – stories of love, sadness, loss or happiness. These emotions are innately human, and they forge the bands of shared experiences that connect us all. In fact, these connections, both large and small, over time are what constitute our humanity.”

William Faulkner once wrote, “The past is never dead, it’s not even past.”

As a business leader, one of my goals is to always really learn about the people I work with. But then I stop and think, how much can I still learn about from those people I have known for years?

My grandparents never had a computer or cell phone, let alone an Ipad. As a matter of fact they had a shared phone line that you had to wait for the neighbors to finish talking before you could make a call. I don't believe they ever flew on an airplane. Their home did not have central air or heat. We thought we would freeze when we were sleeping upstairs. They worked their farm for 15 plus hours each day and hoped the weather cooperated. By all accounts - they had a difficult life. It would be a shame not to learn from it.

But I have to put down my cell phone and Ipad to do it....

Pick up the book. You will not be sorry.

Have a great week.

Rob Bahna

Tags: selling, leadership, leader, sales, Management, business development

Don't let the Senate outsource your job to China!

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Mon, Apr 30, 2012 @01:51 PM

We need your signature to help defeat an innovation-crushing 2.3% medical devices tax slated for January 2013.

It’s an election year. Your signature may persuade the Senate to repeal this ill-conceived measure, estimated to offshore 43,000 American jobs.

Click the link for more information...

http://no2point3.com/

Tags: selling, healthcare suppliers, outsourcing model, market forecasting, sales, business growth, business development

ACA’s 2013 medical device tax has already killed jobs & expansion plans

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Thu, Apr 19, 2012 @10:02 AM

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes a new 2.3% tax on the U.S. sale of medical devices beginning in 2013. The tax was included to raise $20 billion in revenue to partially offset the cost of the new, $1 trillion health program. The 2.3 percent tax is imposed on revenue, not profits, so that the tax applies to devices regardless if they are sold at a loss.
This particular financing measure is now the target for repeal by a growing number of Members in Congress because of its impact on patient access to life-saving therapies, American jobs, and medical innovation in the United States.

Regardless of how the Supreme Court rules on the ACA, there are many claims about the tax that are inaccurate and do not reflect existing realities about its impact.

Jobs and investment will suffer
 
Claim: The new tax will not shift employment offshore because the tax does not create an incentive to move production overseas.
Reality: Even without going into effect until 2013, the device excise tax has already caused companies to lay-off workers, grow device manufacturing jobs outside the U.S., reduce investment in research and development, and eliminate capital investment in new U.S. facilities. The device excise tax applies to the sale of medical devices in the U.S.

This is on top of our federal tax rate at 35 percent and state and local taxes. Combining these U.S. taxes with a slow and cumbersome approval process, the excise tax adds tremendous disincentive to companies wanting to stay in the U.S. and compete in the global marketplace. Compare Ireland’s tax of 12.5 percent of profit and Canada’s national tax of about 15 percent of profit for most companies to the existing U.S. tax rate of 35 percent that many companies face.
 
Tack on the new federal tax of 2.3 percent of sales, which equals about a tax of 15 percent on profit for most companies, and U.S. manufacturers in 2013 will pay a tax of about 50 percent for every dollar earned. Companies operating outside the United States will be at a distinct competitive advantage as those taxes start from a significantly lower base.
 
It’s disingenuous to say that that level of taxation will not lead companies to locate new factories and research and development arms outside of the U.S. Foreign manufactures have a clear price advantage by paying a tax bill that can be half what a comparable U.S. firm will pay. Academic claims that the tax will not have an impact on U.S. jobs is naive and does not match reality. Medical device companies have signaled a warning for several months now.
 
Here are just a few examples:
-Stryker Corporation announced a layoff of 1,000 workers due to the tax
-Boston Scientific built a $35+ million research and development center in Ireland instead of North America
-Boston-Scientific is also girding for a $100+ million charge to earnings in 2013
-Zimmer plans to lay off 450 and take a $50 million charge against earnings
-Cook Medical has shelved plans to build a medical device factory annually in the U.S.
 
No windfall for the device industry
 
Claim: The ACA will insure millions of people and therefore device companies will benefit from new business through the sale of more devices.
Reality: Reducing the number of uninsured will not increase the number of patients seeking medical devices. Most of our medical technologies are either used today by patients in emergency situations or by elderly patients who are already insured by Medicare. There will be no windfall for our industry just because more, non-elderly patients have access to insurance.

 
Here’s why: In the emergency room today, patients receive our technologies regardless of whether they have health insurance or not. These devices that are used in this setting include drainage catheters, tracheostomy tubes, intubation devices and myriad of other devices to maintain life. Federal law requires that all patients in need of emergency services be treated regardless of their ability to pay or whether they have health coverage. The ACA does not change this paradigm.
 
Further, the administration has stated that the demographic group that will most benefit under the ACA are the non-elderly. Young people tend not to be in need of stenting or other vascular or organ repairs for aging related conditions. Most of the patients that use our products are elderly and today they are either treated in the emergency room without regard to health insurance or covered by Medicare that already reimburses hospitals for medical devices.
 
This analysis is borne out in Massachusetts, which has a similar universal health care approach. Internal analysis shows that medical device sales did not increase beyond the increase expected prior to enactment of the Massachusetts new health law.
 
Devastating impact on medical innovation

Claim: Tax will have little effect on medical innovation.
Reality: The device excise tax will have a real and serious impact on medical innovation in the United States as research, development and manufacturing move overseas as a result of the existing tax and regulatory systems in this country. While the medical technology industry has helped to fuel the U.S. economy in recent years, its position as a global leader may erode over the next decade.
 
This will no doubt affect: 1) the ability of Americans to access future break-through medical advancements; and, 2) the growth of U.S. jobs. In the future, China, India and Brazil will experience the strongest gains in developing next-generation products. Without changes to U.S. policies, gains may lead to an exodus of capital, jobs and research away from the U.S. toward these growing markets. (Source: ’Medical Technology Innovation Scorecard: The Race for Global Leadership,’ PwC, January 2011.)
 
The economics of this highly competitive sector are not static and several policies have driven American medical device companies to seek clinical data and launch new products outside of the United States. The new, 2.3 percent excise tax on the selling price of a device will leave companies no choice but to reduce research and development and capital investment in the U.S. It will lead companies to migrate to lower cost tax jurisdictions and tax start-up companies, whether those firms have profits or not.
 
The new tax will force companies to limit research budgets to test new products and ideas – the lifeblood of growing device companies. When these resources are curtailed, patients pay the price with more limited medical treatment and a reduced chance of survival.
 
In addition, the tax will limit capital investment in new facilities. Boston-Scientific projects a $100+ million annual hit to earnings from the tax. Cook estimates it will cost $20 million a year ’ about what we had planned to invest annually in new factories across the Midwest, factories such as the plant that opened 1n 2010 in Canton, Ill., or the expanded plants opened in 2009 in Spencer, IN.
 
Wages from those jobs ripple through and strengthen the local community. This new device excise tax will deny patients access to life-saving medical technologies because companies will be forced to move jobs and research facilities overseas. It is fool-hardy to believe that U.S. companies will be able to compete globally when their competitors do not face the tax and regulatory burdens here in the United States. We are already seeing the impact of the medical device tax and this is just the beginning if this tax is not repealed. Americans deserve access to these break-through technologies.

MEDCITY – Devices
April 16, 2012
By Kem Hawkins (President and CEO of Cook, Inc.)

Tags: hospitals, healthcare suppliers, IDNs, integrated delivery networks, medical devices, market research, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Affordable Care Act, ACA, market forecasting, sales

Winning

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, Apr 10, 2012 @12:14 PM

I have been involved in hiring hundreds of sales people and managers in my career. Not once during the interviews for these jobs did any candidate say, "I want to lose" or "I don't care about winning".
 
Every one of us says we want to win - and I believe that is true. So why do we have people who continually succeed despite the challenges that are put in front of them and others who effectively give up the day the goal or quota is assigned?
 
In some ways I believe it is about really having the Will to win. Coach Bobby Knight once said that "the will to win is not nearly as important as the will to prepare to win."
 
Let's use presentations as an example. When you give a presentation to a customer, your own team or even in public, you know going in how well prepared you are and how much work you have done to be ready. If you are completely confident because your preparation has been flawless, it is apparent to everyone who hears you.
 
We have all been on the other end of a presentation where someone was not prepared because they did not own the material. I certainly don't want someone reading slides to me instead of having an engaged conversation whenever possible.
 
When I started selling very few people had cell phones, email was just starting and people actually didn't answer their phones or text during the meetings. And unless it was a doctor, very rarely did anyone interrupt a meeting that was taking place.
 
But just as those thing change - so has our ability to prepare with the data and knowledge that is readily available on companies and people. Can you imagine asking the president of a company "what does your organization do"? Yet - many people are not prepared to ask intelligent questions and show that they have done their homework. Every person we deal with wants us to be prepared and show them that we value their time.
 
If you watch cooking shows, it is easy to see the finished meal and say - wow, that is great. But it doesn't happen without practice and repetition, preparation and hard work.
 
It's not what you want, but what you do that matters. Everyone wants to win. Some people choose to.

Have a great week.
 
Rob Bahna

Vice President of Sales
Rescuscitation International

Tags: selling, leadership, determination, teamwork, leader, sales, business growth, strategic thinking, business development

The Relationship Curve

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 @01:23 PM



Amy Hardin

SELLect Sales

www.sellectsales.com

Tags: selling, leadership, sales, business growth, Management, strategic thinking, business development

Spring Training

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Thu, Mar 08, 2012 @12:29 PM

Here we are getting ready to start the 2012 Major League Baseball season with another Spring Training under way. You can almost smell the fresh cut grass, hot dogs, peanuts and taste the cold beer as the warm sun hits your face.


Each year these elite players spend weeks getting ready to do the one thing that they have been doing all their lives - playing baseball. And then the regular season lasts for 162 games followed by the playoffs.

The following numbers are provided by the NCAA about the chances of being drafted by a major league baseball team (this is not making the majors - but just being drafted so the real odds are worse).

--High school senior players who go on to play NCAA men`s baseball: Less than three in 50, or 5.6 percent

-- NCAA senior players drafted by a Major League Baseball (MLB) team: Less than eleven in 100, or 10.5 percent.

-- High school senior players eventually drafted by an MLB team: About one in 200, or 0.5 percent. Drafted baseball players almost always go to a minor league team. These teams abound; there are over 150 of them, compared to 30 in the majors. The big leagues have 750 players, yet the 2004 draft alone took 1,500. Hence some estimate that only one in 33 minor leaguers ever makes it to the pros. If that's correct, the chance of a high school player making the big leagues is one in 6,600, or 0.015 percent. That's roughly the chance of a thief guessing your PIN number on the first try

Why then do these elite players - the millionaires, the best of the best, who have been doing this their entire life focus on the fundamentals and basics in Spring Training? The answer is, of course, that to make that elite team it takes tremendous talent and skill. But at that level it also takes hard work and effort to be the best of the best - just like in any field.

How often are you practicing, evaluating and working on your skills and that of your team? How much do you spend making your team better?

In today's major leagues, players spend countless hours studying videotapes to try to gain a competitive advantage on the competition in any way that they can. That includes video of themselves and what they are doing well and need to improve upon. Do you? Are you studying what your competition is doing?

Show me a person who knows it all, and I will show you someone who I don't want on my team. Show me someone who has had success, and wants to continue improving and working to continue that success - and always find a better way, and I will show you a superstar.

Have a great week.

Rob Bahna

Vice President of Sales
Rescuscitation International

Tags: selling, leadership, teamwork, leader, sales, business growth, Management, business development

Follow Up Calls

Posted by Stan Schroeder on Thu, Feb 16, 2012 @03:45 PM

In my 20 years of medical sales experience, one of the most common mistakes I see sales professionals make is having follow-up calls that are not what they should be. If you are calling someone who has done business with your organization in the past but you don't know them well - or it is your first time personally calling them, make sure you are well prepared.
 
And do yourself a favor - put as much pre-call planning into your phone calls as you do your personal visits for the best results. There really should be no such thing as a "cold call" any more with key people in an organization since you can do so much research before you call. If they have any authority - they expect that you have done your homework.
 
Here is an outline I might use to call on someone I don't know well....
 
Good morning _____, this is Rob Bahna with Resuscitation International.
 
I have been working with other ________ departments (or title you are talking to), discussing some ideas that have helped them deal with some of the unique challenges they are facing today with SCA victims. We have seen some outstanding customer satisfaction and positively affected patient outcomes.
 
I would like to ask you a few questions to see if some of our solutions might make sense for your department.
I would like verify some of the information I have been able to learn about your facility and
make sure I understand them from your perspective as the ____________(title)?
 
Ask about them…..

 
I understand you have been a _________ for 5 years. What are the biggest changes you have seen in that time as it relates to how your responsibilities have evolved? Where do you find yourself spending a lot of time where you didn’t use to?
 
Besides yourself, who else do you involve in the important process of purchasing medical supplies and equipment?
 
Sell Your Company
 
Jane, we know it is important for you to know who you are doing business with. Resuscitation International has been servicing the emergency medical supply and equipment needs of pre-hospital professionals for 10 years. We have a proven track record of being an industry leader. We are proud to have more than 100,000 agencies and professionals rely on RI.
 
OR

 ______, as you are well aware, over the last 10 years we have seen a shift in acuity levels. You are being asked to do higher levels of care in many situations with less resources, especially in today’s economy. RI has been in business for over 10 years – and we can help you deal with these challenging times.
 
Determine Your Customer’s Objectives
 
Make them stop and think – ask high gain questions that differentiate you and are not only situational.
 
 
1) What Criteria do you use to evaluate your potential suppliers (business partners)?

2) How do you prefer to place your orders?
 
3) Which company do you currently order your supplies from today?

Do you order from more than one company?
 
4) Could you please share with me what your experience has been with Resuscitation International?
 
If they do not volunteer it – ask them
 
5) It looks like you have not ordered from us in the last ______, could you share with me some of the reasons?
 
 
Engineer Agreement to Demonstrate Product-Program
 
 
________, I appreciate you taking the time to share this information with me. Based on your feedback, and some recent changes we have made it (whatever areas kept them from ordering from us – or things they like about others) we believe we can make your job of ordering easier and be very competitive from a price perspective.

When do you normally place your supply orders? What do we need to do to earn a shot at your next order?
 
If my pricing is competitive, would there be any other reason that would prevent us from doing business together?
 
Best of Luck. Be proud to put your signature on everything you do. Or don't do it.
 
Rob Bahna
Vice President of Sales
Resuscitation International

Tags: selling, Essential Healthcare Management, hospitals, healthcare suppliers, teamwork, medical devices, brand management, market research, priorities, sales, business growth, Management, strategic thinking, business development