The Catalyst … accelerating business growth in healthcare

Are You Talking Too Much?

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Thu, Jun 21, 2012 @02:03 PM

Frank Ripullo was recently quoted in an ANAE "Sales Tips" for Reps Who Like to Win Issue
"Many Sales Representatives are talking too much. When you're talking, you're telling. When you ask questions to get clients talking about their needs, you're selling; you're finding out what they want to own. Only then can you guide them to the right product or service"

Frank Ripullo
Managing Partner/Founder
Essential Health Management

Tags: selling, Essential Healthcare Management, brand management, Frank Ripullo, business growth, strategic thinking

Wish You Well

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, May 15, 2012 @11:06 AM

As an avid reader, I appreciate it when others share learning opportunities that they occasionally find from unique and outstanding books. Many of you may be familiar with David Baldacci, the best selling author of many books about politics, spies and intrigue. If not, his books are some of my favorite from the action based fiction category. However, it was one of his that I came across recently that is one that I hope you pick up - and give to your children if you have them.

The book, called Wish You Well, is actually required reading in school districts throughout the country. It tells the story of twelve year old Louisa Mae Cardinal and her tranisition from New York city of 1940, to living in the Virginia mountains with her great-grandmother on her farm.

My mother grew up on a farm with 9 siblings in Ohio. And some of this book and story relates to me in this way. But the other thing that Baldacci points out is that we really don't take the time to learn even about our families and take advantage of that history.

But, Baldacci says it much better than I can. Here are some quotes from various parts of the book:

“Unfortunately, we live in a time where everyone seems to be solely looking ahead, as though we deem nothing in the past worthy of our attention. The future is always fresh and exciting, and it has a pull on us that times past simply can never muster. Yet it may be our greatest wealth as human beings can be “discovered” by simply looking behind us.” David Baldacci in his author’s note for the book “Wish You Well”.

“One’s courage, hope and spirit can be severely tried by the happenstance of life. But as I learned on that Virginia mountain, as long as one never loses faith, it is impossible to ever truly be alone.”

“I hope that once you close the last page of Wish You Well, you will want to journey through the past of your own family, to learn the things you never knew before – stories of love, sadness, loss or happiness. These emotions are innately human, and they forge the bands of shared experiences that connect us all. In fact, these connections, both large and small, over time are what constitute our humanity.”

William Faulkner once wrote, “The past is never dead, it’s not even past.”

As a business leader, one of my goals is to always really learn about the people I work with. But then I stop and think, how much can I still learn about from those people I have known for years?

My grandparents never had a computer or cell phone, let alone an Ipad. As a matter of fact they had a shared phone line that you had to wait for the neighbors to finish talking before you could make a call. I don't believe they ever flew on an airplane. Their home did not have central air or heat. We thought we would freeze when we were sleeping upstairs. They worked their farm for 15 plus hours each day and hoped the weather cooperated. By all accounts - they had a difficult life. It would be a shame not to learn from it.

But I have to put down my cell phone and Ipad to do it....

Pick up the book. You will not be sorry.

Have a great week.

Rob Bahna

Tags: selling, leadership, leader, sales, Management, business development

Don't let the Senate outsource your job to China!

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Mon, Apr 30, 2012 @01:51 PM

We need your signature to help defeat an innovation-crushing 2.3% medical devices tax slated for January 2013.

It’s an election year. Your signature may persuade the Senate to repeal this ill-conceived measure, estimated to offshore 43,000 American jobs.

Click the link for more information...

http://no2point3.com/

Tags: selling, healthcare suppliers, outsourcing model, market forecasting, sales, business growth, business development

Winning

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, Apr 10, 2012 @12:14 PM

I have been involved in hiring hundreds of sales people and managers in my career. Not once during the interviews for these jobs did any candidate say, "I want to lose" or "I don't care about winning".
 
Every one of us says we want to win - and I believe that is true. So why do we have people who continually succeed despite the challenges that are put in front of them and others who effectively give up the day the goal or quota is assigned?
 
In some ways I believe it is about really having the Will to win. Coach Bobby Knight once said that "the will to win is not nearly as important as the will to prepare to win."
 
Let's use presentations as an example. When you give a presentation to a customer, your own team or even in public, you know going in how well prepared you are and how much work you have done to be ready. If you are completely confident because your preparation has been flawless, it is apparent to everyone who hears you.
 
We have all been on the other end of a presentation where someone was not prepared because they did not own the material. I certainly don't want someone reading slides to me instead of having an engaged conversation whenever possible.
 
When I started selling very few people had cell phones, email was just starting and people actually didn't answer their phones or text during the meetings. And unless it was a doctor, very rarely did anyone interrupt a meeting that was taking place.
 
But just as those thing change - so has our ability to prepare with the data and knowledge that is readily available on companies and people. Can you imagine asking the president of a company "what does your organization do"? Yet - many people are not prepared to ask intelligent questions and show that they have done their homework. Every person we deal with wants us to be prepared and show them that we value their time.
 
If you watch cooking shows, it is easy to see the finished meal and say - wow, that is great. But it doesn't happen without practice and repetition, preparation and hard work.
 
It's not what you want, but what you do that matters. Everyone wants to win. Some people choose to.

Have a great week.
 
Rob Bahna

Vice President of Sales
Rescuscitation International

Tags: selling, leadership, determination, teamwork, leader, sales, business growth, strategic thinking, business development

The Relationship Curve

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Tue, Mar 20, 2012 @01:23 PM



Amy Hardin

SELLect Sales

www.sellectsales.com

Tags: selling, leadership, sales, business growth, Management, strategic thinking, business development

Spring Training

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Thu, Mar 08, 2012 @12:29 PM

Here we are getting ready to start the 2012 Major League Baseball season with another Spring Training under way. You can almost smell the fresh cut grass, hot dogs, peanuts and taste the cold beer as the warm sun hits your face.


Each year these elite players spend weeks getting ready to do the one thing that they have been doing all their lives - playing baseball. And then the regular season lasts for 162 games followed by the playoffs.

The following numbers are provided by the NCAA about the chances of being drafted by a major league baseball team (this is not making the majors - but just being drafted so the real odds are worse).

--High school senior players who go on to play NCAA men`s baseball: Less than three in 50, or 5.6 percent

-- NCAA senior players drafted by a Major League Baseball (MLB) team: Less than eleven in 100, or 10.5 percent.

-- High school senior players eventually drafted by an MLB team: About one in 200, or 0.5 percent. Drafted baseball players almost always go to a minor league team. These teams abound; there are over 150 of them, compared to 30 in the majors. The big leagues have 750 players, yet the 2004 draft alone took 1,500. Hence some estimate that only one in 33 minor leaguers ever makes it to the pros. If that's correct, the chance of a high school player making the big leagues is one in 6,600, or 0.015 percent. That's roughly the chance of a thief guessing your PIN number on the first try

Why then do these elite players - the millionaires, the best of the best, who have been doing this their entire life focus on the fundamentals and basics in Spring Training? The answer is, of course, that to make that elite team it takes tremendous talent and skill. But at that level it also takes hard work and effort to be the best of the best - just like in any field.

How often are you practicing, evaluating and working on your skills and that of your team? How much do you spend making your team better?

In today's major leagues, players spend countless hours studying videotapes to try to gain a competitive advantage on the competition in any way that they can. That includes video of themselves and what they are doing well and need to improve upon. Do you? Are you studying what your competition is doing?

Show me a person who knows it all, and I will show you someone who I don't want on my team. Show me someone who has had success, and wants to continue improving and working to continue that success - and always find a better way, and I will show you a superstar.

Have a great week.

Rob Bahna

Vice President of Sales
Rescuscitation International

Tags: selling, leadership, teamwork, leader, sales, business growth, Management, business development

Follow Up Calls

Posted by Stan Schroeder on Thu, Feb 16, 2012 @03:45 PM

In my 20 years of medical sales experience, one of the most common mistakes I see sales professionals make is having follow-up calls that are not what they should be. If you are calling someone who has done business with your organization in the past but you don't know them well - or it is your first time personally calling them, make sure you are well prepared.
 
And do yourself a favor - put as much pre-call planning into your phone calls as you do your personal visits for the best results. There really should be no such thing as a "cold call" any more with key people in an organization since you can do so much research before you call. If they have any authority - they expect that you have done your homework.
 
Here is an outline I might use to call on someone I don't know well....
 
Good morning _____, this is Rob Bahna with Resuscitation International.
 
I have been working with other ________ departments (or title you are talking to), discussing some ideas that have helped them deal with some of the unique challenges they are facing today with SCA victims. We have seen some outstanding customer satisfaction and positively affected patient outcomes.
 
I would like to ask you a few questions to see if some of our solutions might make sense for your department.
I would like verify some of the information I have been able to learn about your facility and
make sure I understand them from your perspective as the ____________(title)?
 
Ask about them…..

 
I understand you have been a _________ for 5 years. What are the biggest changes you have seen in that time as it relates to how your responsibilities have evolved? Where do you find yourself spending a lot of time where you didn’t use to?
 
Besides yourself, who else do you involve in the important process of purchasing medical supplies and equipment?
 
Sell Your Company
 
Jane, we know it is important for you to know who you are doing business with. Resuscitation International has been servicing the emergency medical supply and equipment needs of pre-hospital professionals for 10 years. We have a proven track record of being an industry leader. We are proud to have more than 100,000 agencies and professionals rely on RI.
 
OR

 ______, as you are well aware, over the last 10 years we have seen a shift in acuity levels. You are being asked to do higher levels of care in many situations with less resources, especially in today’s economy. RI has been in business for over 10 years – and we can help you deal with these challenging times.
 
Determine Your Customer’s Objectives
 
Make them stop and think – ask high gain questions that differentiate you and are not only situational.
 
 
1) What Criteria do you use to evaluate your potential suppliers (business partners)?

2) How do you prefer to place your orders?
 
3) Which company do you currently order your supplies from today?

Do you order from more than one company?
 
4) Could you please share with me what your experience has been with Resuscitation International?
 
If they do not volunteer it – ask them
 
5) It looks like you have not ordered from us in the last ______, could you share with me some of the reasons?
 
 
Engineer Agreement to Demonstrate Product-Program
 
 
________, I appreciate you taking the time to share this information with me. Based on your feedback, and some recent changes we have made it (whatever areas kept them from ordering from us – or things they like about others) we believe we can make your job of ordering easier and be very competitive from a price perspective.

When do you normally place your supply orders? What do we need to do to earn a shot at your next order?
 
If my pricing is competitive, would there be any other reason that would prevent us from doing business together?
 
Best of Luck. Be proud to put your signature on everything you do. Or don't do it.
 
Rob Bahna
Vice President of Sales
Resuscitation International

Tags: selling, Essential Healthcare Management, hospitals, healthcare suppliers, teamwork, medical devices, brand management, market research, priorities, sales, business growth, Management, strategic thinking, business development

Overcoming Stalls and Objections

Posted by Jessica Hartman DeVore on Fri, Feb 10, 2012 @01:35 PM



A SELLect Sales Tip from Amy Hardin

Tags: selling, leadership, Essential Healthcare Management, determination, web video, sales, business growth, Management, business development

Perfect Practice Makes Perfect

Posted by Stan Schroeder on Wed, Jan 04, 2012 @01:16 PM

The old axiom "Practice Makes Perfect" has been around for a long time. Anyone who has seen my golf game knows that Practice Does Not Make Perfect. Perfect Practice Makes Perfect. If I go to the driving range, what I do is practice my imperfect golf swing, to make it more consistently bad.

If we talk about my softball swing - it is another story. From years of baseball from little league through college, and 25 years of softball, I know the fundamentals of the swing and what it should be. The more I practice, the more confident I become and the more muscle memory kicks in so I don't have to think about it.

Have you made any New Years Resolutions for 2012? Why do so many resolutions fail? Most resolutions (assuming they are reasonable, achievable and important to the person making them) fail because we don't make them habits. You have probably seen different opinions on how long we have to do something to make it a habit. I have often heard it takes 21 days (or 28 days) of consistently doing something before something becomes a habit.

Psychological research on this question in a paper was recently published in the European Journal of Social Psychology. Phillippa Lally and colleagues from University College London recruited 96 people who were interested in forming a new habit such as eating a piece of fruit with lunch or doing a 15 minute run each day Lally et al. (2009). Participants were then asked daily how automatic their chosen behaviours felt. These questions included things like whether the behaviour was 'hard not to do' and could be done 'without thinking'.

When the researchers examined the different habits, many of the participants showed a curved relationship between practice and the automaticity of it. On average a plateau in automaticity was reached after 66 days. In other words it had become as much of a habit as it was ever going to become.

Although the average was 66 days, there was marked variation in how long habits took to form, anywhere from 18 days up to 254 days in the habits examined in this study. As you'd imagine, drinking a daily glass of water became automatic very quickly but doing 50 sit-ups before breakfast required more dedication.

The researchers also noted that:

Missing a single day did not reduce the chance of forming a habit.
A sub-group took much longer than the others to form their habits, perhaps suggesting some people are 'habit-resistant'.
Other types of habits may well take much longer.

66 days is a considerable amount of time and requires strong commitment. And remember that this applies to business habits as well.

If you want call on 2 new prospects each day in addition to your current customers, track your progress each day for 66 days.

If you want to do a better job of asking for referalls, track your progress for 66 days.

If you want to lose weight, track your calorie intake, or your calories burned during excercise , check out the free App Lose It! for the iIPad or IPhone. It will give you a good example of tracking and how motivating that can be.

And practicing bad habits will not get you the results you are looking for, don't hesitate to ask for help to make sure you are practicing correctly.

Have a great 2012.

Sincerely,

Rob Bahna

Tags: selling, leadership, determination, leader, priorities, referrals, business growth, business development

A Big Little Life

Posted by Stan Schroeder on Wed, Dec 21, 2011 @01:02 PM

I am an avid reader. This weekend I read probably the only Dean Koontz book I have never read - "A Big Little Life".
 
For those of you who are not Dean Koontz fans (and don't say you are not if you have never read one of his books), this is a non-fiction book he wrote as a memoir about his golden retriever, Trixie.
 
Admittedly, I am a dog lover. I am fortunate to have a great dog, Jeffrey, that has given us more joy and happiness than we could have imagined. As you know, the books and movies about dogs have been very popular in the past few years. I don't think that is coincidental with the down economy and other pressures we all face in our world today.
 
This book is worth the $15 price tag and I found several different parts in the book that really made me think about our relationships with dogs, and how we view the world if we stop and analyze it from the perspective of why dogs are our "best friends".
 
Trixie was adopted at the age of 3 and for the next 9 years impacted Dean and his wife Gerda with her " intelligence, her innate joy and her uncanny knack for living in the moment."
 
A few passages from the book:
 
"In this big world, she (Trixie) was a little thing, but in all the ways that mattered, including the effect she had on those who loved her, she lived a big life."
 
"Dog's joy is directly related to the fact that they do not deceive, do not betray, and do not covet. Innocence is neither naive nor unhip; innocence is the condition of deepest bliss."
 
"Loyalty, unfailing love, instant forgiveness, a humble sense of his place in the scheme of things, a sense of wonder - these and other virtues of a dog arise from his innocence. The first step toward greater joy is to stop fleeing from innocence, begin retreating from cynicism and nihilism, and embrace once more the truth that life is mysterious and that it daily offers meaningful wonders for our consideration."
 
'When we have the deepest affection for a dog, we do not possess that love but are possessed by it, and sometimes takes us by surprise, overwhelms us. When we take a dog into our lives, we ask for it trust, and the trust is freely given. We promise, I will always love you and bring you through troubled times. The promise is sincerely, solemnly made. But in a dog's life as in our own, there come those moments when we are not in control, when we are forced to acknowledge our essential helplessness. Looking into the trusting eyes of the dog, which feels safe in our care, and knowing that we not deserve the totality of its faith in us, we are shaken and humbled."
 
T.S Eliot: The only wisdom we can hope to acquire / Is the wisdom of humility.
 
"Dog's lives are short, too short, but you know that going in. You know the pain is coming, you're going to lose a dog, and there's going to be great anguish, so you live fully in the moment with her, never fail to share her joy or delight in her innocence, because you can't support the illusion that a dog can be your lifelong companion. There's such beauty in the hard honesty of accepting that and giving love while always aware that it comes with an unbearable price. Maybe loving dogs is a way we do penance for all the other illusions we allow ourselves and for the mistakes we make because off those illusions."
 
Dogs live most of life
in Quiet Heart.
Humans live mostly next door
in Desperate Heart.
Now and then will do you good
to live in our zip code.
 
- Trixie Koontz, Bliss to You
 
Have a fantastic Holiday season and New Year. And may all of us live A Big Little Life..
 
Rob

Tags: selling, teamwork, Quality, sales, business growth, strategic thinking, business development